Zika poses even greater risk for birth defects than was previously known, CDC reports

About 1 in 10 pregnant women infected with Zika in the United States last year had a baby or fetus with serious birth defects, according to a study released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It is said to represent the largest and most comprehensive study of Zika’s consequences for pregnant women. The study found that women infected during the first trimester of pregnancy had an estimated risk of birth defects of … Continued

Editorial: Another kind of Zika public health emergency

A year after WHO declared the Zika virus epidemic a public health emergency, Director-General Margaret Chan has reflected on the rightness of that decision. However, she misses the opportunity to urge and specify international attention, research, and resources for the individuals left devastated by Zika virus.

Microcephaly in infants of people with Zika virus declining in Brazil

The headline in the Washington Post on 7 February was: “The panic is over at Zika’s epicenter. But for many, the struggle has just begun.” However; cases have not disappeared, even though the numbers have fallen, and families are coping with the children who were born, as the article reports with many examples.

As many as 70% of Recife’s inhabitants contracted Zika in 2015 and 2016, according to Pedro Pires, an obstetrician-gynaecologist who specializes in Zika. However, that high rate of infection likely prevented a revival of the epidemic in recent months because most of the population has become immune.

Zika and pregnancy in Brazil: special thematic section

Zika virus and women, by Debora Diniz; The debate on abortion and Zika: lessons from the AIDS epidemic, by Thais Medina Coeli Rochel de Camargo; Women’s reproductive rights and the Zika virus epidemic, Jacqueline Pitanguy; Comment on the paper by Pitanguy, by Florencia Luna; Ensuring a rights-based health sector response to women affected by Zika, by Paige Baum, Anna Fiastro, Shane Kunselman, et al; Comment on the article by Baum et al, by Ana Maria González Vélez; Zika and reproductive justice, by Alexandra Minna Stern

Using Uruguay’s harm reduction approach to allow women with Zika infection to have legal abortions & WHO advice on Zika

The Vice Minister of Public Health in Uruguay, who introduced a harm reduction policy for reducing the risk of unsafe abortions before the country’s abortion law was reformed, has suggested a similar policy in relation to Zika infection | WHO releases new advice on Olympic Games, Zika infection, pregnancy and safer sex.

Statement: UN High Commissioner for Human Rights

Upholding women’s human rights essential to Zika response Upholding women’s human rights is essential if the response to the Zika health emergency is to be effective, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein said Friday, adding that laws and policies that restrict access to sexual and reproductive health services in contravention of international standards, must be repealed and concrete steps must be taken so that women have the information, support and services … Continued

Prevention of potential sexual transmission of Zika virus

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WHO Interim Guidance: The primary transmission route of Zika virus is via the Aedes mosquito. However, sexual transmission of Zika virus may also be possible, with limited evidence recorded in a few cases. The current evidence base on Zika virus remains extremely limited. This guidance will be reviewed and the recommendations updated as new evidence emerges.

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