ENGLAND – Conscientious objection: personal and professional ethics in the public square

English law expects health professionals to have, and act upon, consciences, but formal conscience clauses are not the main legal recognition of this expectation. Rather, they should be regarded as an anomaly with roots in very specific political settlements between society and health professions, whose legitimacy is historically contingent, and as an aspect of the ‘price’ to be paid for securing services.

International law and the provision of abortion services

This blog is an analysis of the international legal issues involved in the decision of the UK Supreme Court not to require the UK Secretary of State for Health to provide abortions on the National Health Service to Northern Irish … Continued

Providing experiential information on early medical abortion: a qualitative evaluation of an animated personal account, Lara’s Story, Scotland

An animated film has been created to provide information to women requesting early medical abortion (EMA). The 9 min film, Lara’s Story, was created using one woman’s personal account of her experience. This study evaluated the views of women who had recently undergone EMA on the film and its potential usefulness in providing experiential information to women requesting EMA.

Voice for Choice challenges Equality and Human Rights Commissioner’s Bill, which violates human rights in pregnancy

  Voice for Choice, the UK’s national coalition of pro-choice campaigning organisations, has submitted a complaint to the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) regarding one of its Commissioners, Lord Shinkwin. Lord Shinkwin has introduced a Private Members’ Bill in … Continued

Decriminalisation of abortion: a discussion paper from the BMA, UK

“The British Medical Association currently does not have policy on the decriminalisation of abortion, and this paper does not include recommendations about whether, and if so how, abortion should be decriminalised. Instead, a number of arguments, put forward by others, … Continued

FEATURE: Abortion stories: making women’s lives visible USA, UK, Ireland, Pakistan

  USA Pregnant against their will, with few options, and fearing for their lives and safety “I’m in the family way again, and I’m nearly crazy, for when my husband finds out that I’m going to have another baby, he … Continued

Abortion law reform in the NI assembly faces delays, but two prosecutions in the courts going ahead

posted in: Newsletter, UK, Western Europe | 0

The Belfast Telegraph apparently always talks about medical abortion pills as “poison” in articles about these prosecutions, using the outdated terminology in the 1861 Offences against the Person Act, the antiquated law under which all the prosecutions are taking place. In fact the pills are on the WHO Essential Medicines List. The Northern Ireland Alliance for Choice has written to the newspaper many times to protest this misnomer but they still use it. The law itself is also still being used to prosecute women across the UK and in many former British colonies, where it also remains on the statute books.

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